Migration Manager for Exchange (QMM/EX) – version 8.10 is available with full Exchange 2013 support

Migration Manager for Exchange 8.10 is available for download via the Dell/Quest support website along with CPUU 5.2. Remarkable is the support for single-hop Exchange 2003 to Exchange 2013 migration scenarios and public folder migration coexistence to Exchange 2013 public folder mailbox technology.
Together with Exchange 2013 as target mailbox system, wave 15 of Office 365 is also officially supported.

According to the release notes, QMM Exchange 8.10 provides the following features:

  • Migrate Microsoft Exchange 2000–2010 mailboxes to Microsoft Exchange 2013 without locking users out of their mailboxes.
  • Benefit from direct one-step migration from legacy Microsoft Exchange 2000–2010 servers to Microsoft Exchange 2013.
  • Migrate your public folders from Microsoft Exchange 2000–2010 to Microsoft Exchange 2013 with co-existence enabled.
  • Benefit from full two-way calendar (free/busy) synchronization between Microsoft Exchange 2000-2010 and Microsoft Exchange 2013 organizations during the migration.
  • Migrate Microsoft Exchange 2000–2010 mailboxes to Microsoft Office 365 Wave 15 without locking users out of their mailboxes and without extra pre-migration steps. Set up full two-way calendar (free/busy) synchronization during the migration process.
  • Consolidate your multiple source forests into the single Office 365 cloud.
  • Migrate your Microsoft Exchange organization to an existing hybrid environment with single sign-on enabled.
  • Use Migration Manager for Active Directory to create mail-enabled user accounts, and benefit from using the native move job for your Microsoft Exchange 2003–2010 to Microsoft Exchange 2003–2010 migrations (an Exchange 2010 CAS server in the source or target organization is required).

Client Profile Updating Utility 5.2 (aka EMWProf):

  • Client Profile Updating Utility (CPUU): Support switching Microsoft Outlook 2013 user profiles from source to target Exchange server
  • Client Profile Updating Utility (CPUU): Support for Windows 8 as an end-user platform
  • Client Profile Updating Utility (CPUU): Support for Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 as a target.

(Source: “Release Notes for Quest Migration Manager for Exchange, April 30th”)

Coexistence Manager for Notes – new release 3.4.1

Version 3.4.1 corrects minor problems and contains all existing hotfixes

Dell/Quest Software released a new version of Coexistence Manager for Notes. Actual Version is now 3.4.1.
The 3.4.1 is mainly focussed on correcting bugs and improving product Quality.
Coexistence Manager for Notes provides coexistence between Exchange and Notes E-Mail Systems and eases migration activities in large scale infrastructures.

The release 3.4.1 is compatible with Exchange 2013, Exchange 2010 SP3 and Outlook 2013 and provides enhanced iOS Support.

Improved Features sinceversion 3.4.0:

  • a Directory Connector Engine for more granular control
  • Simplified customization of object naming, Attribute mapping and filtering
  • Exchange resource scheduling by Notes users during coexistence period.

Exchange Migration to Office 365 can change behind the scenes – wave 15 rolls in

In these days Microsoft is moving from wave 14 to wave 15 for Office 365 cloud installations. This means a service transition from Exchange 2010 Server backend to Exchange 2013 Server backend, Lync 2010 to Lync 2013 and other cool updates.

However, if you have travelled a long way to get a smooth migration setup (with all the back and forth of finding the right strategy and technical conditions) Microsoft can make you a big surprise by changing your Exchange target infrastructure. You started your migration project with Exchange 2010 in the cloud as target system and you end up with Exchange 2013.

This is “by design” when moving services to the cloud – as MVP Sean McNeill stated in his post [http://office365evangelist.com/?p=938]:
This is an important questions because with a move to the cloud, the company give up some control on when, and even if, you will go through an upgrade of the service. The company now relies on the Service Provider, Microsoft in this case, to handle the upgrade and the cadence of the upgrades. This needs to be fully understood and accepted by a company moving to the Cloud.”

To mitigate the risk of forcing the customers to update in times where it is just neither “comfortable” nor “amusable” – as it might be in the middle of an Exchange migration project – Microsoft offers to postpone the update one time. The Office 365 admins receive a notification e-mail which announces the update schedule. From that information the customer has 3 weeks to decide that he better postpone or let Microsoft execute. When he decides to postpone, Microsoft will not start the update for the next 2 months. The timespan to complete the wave 15 upgrade is end of 2013 latest, which means your upgrade cannot be later than this deadline.
http://community.office365.com/en-us/wikis/upgrade/what-to-expect-during-the-service-upgrade.aspx

For more information check the Office 365 Upgrade Center: http://community.office365.com/en-us/wikis/upgrade/office-365-service-upgrade-center-for-enterprise.aspx

Dell/Quest Software seems to recognize first problems in running migration projects and recommends to postpone the Office 365 tenant upgrade by contacting Microsoft.

https://support.quest.com/SolutionDetail.aspx?id=SOL105116&pr=Notes+Migrator+for+Exchange

Quest Migration Manager for Exchange®: 10 commendments for EMWProf usage

Updating Outlook profiles after completing the back end mailbox switch is required to connect the user to the target mailbox.
Quest Migration Manager for Exchange ships with the CPUU (Client Profile Updating Utility), aka EMWProf, to streamline and automate this task. Although the configuration of a starter script is easy, we usually end up with an educated script that does a lot around the EMWProf procedure to avoid issues and to prepare for other services like Lync and Exchange UM.
Based on the experience of several long time projects we recommend to have a look into the following aspects.

10 things to know about Outlook profile updating with EMWProf (CPUU)

 

  1. Check if Outlook 2010 is configured with multiple accounts. Since there is a restriction with CPUU, users with multiple Exchange accounts in a single Outlook 2010 profile have to reconfigure Outlook or need to be supported after migration.
  2. Running EMWProf with administrative credentials can save a lot of access problems when switching profiles. Passwords are encrypted as a feature of the CPUU and this works fine.
  3. Running into the EMWProf script each time when a user logs on, creates too much impact. You can create a group, where membership is given after backend mailbox switch. You can create a check in the EMWProf script that checks whether EMWProf did run before on the client and prevents additional starting of the EMWProf procedure.
  4. Disable Windows Search. In many cases, Windows Search locked the ost file because of indexing and EMWProf could not rename it, what EMWProf caused to fail. You cannot stop the Windows Search service because it restarts by itself. Disable and enable afterwards. With Lync client installed and integrated with Exchange/Outlook, several Lync processes are active and block EMWProf from working properly.
  5. If the user has multiple profiles configured in Outlook 2010, EMWProf tries to process all of them and will create a return code that is not unique. You should first scan the registry for Outlook profiles in CPUU script and then run dedicated EMWProf for each profile, to get the return code. EMWProf will also send a message for each profile separately, which makes it easy to differ between good and bad, important and unimportant.
  6. Deployment of EMWProf via logon script is not enough in nowadays. Many laptops stay in Hibernate only and are unlocked w/o domain logon. As a fallback, a link in the Goodbye message should point to the EMWProf script and can be executed by the user. More advanced solutions distribute the EMWProf binaries via software distribution and the EMWProf script checks first, whether the binaries exist locally and if not, it pulls them from a remote share before executing. This helps a lot in small bandwidth scenarios. Even more educated solutions use a migration database where the EMWProf script can upload the results of the client side part of the mailbox migration.
  7. For terminal server use you should configure a specific EMWProf script. Processing of offline profiles is not necessary there as an example. Make the script as slim as possible and it will work fast and with less issues.
  8. Sometimes localized Goodbye/Welcome messages sent by QMM switch procedure are important. You can change the message text per Mail Source Agent. If you have regional based setup, you can send localized language mails easily by feeding the MSAs with a specific message text.
  9. Do you need a Welcome message sent by QMM? It has advantages and disadvantages. If mailbox switch and Outlook switch was successful, why confusing the user with more technical explanations and notifications.
  10. Heaven and hell of transferring read/unread status of items. QMM mail agents sync read/unread status and CPUU does as well to fill the last gap. This is very helpful to make the target mailbox experience for the user close to the “zero impact” (Quest language!) idea. However, this feature can turn into black, when the user starts to work for weeks with his Laptop and his new mailbox, then goes back to his Desktop Computer, is still connected to his old mailbox and executes EMWProf again. It does what it should and will make the items in target look like in the source mailbox. Be careful, we have seen assistants being very set up when realizing that they have 120 unread messages in the inbox from past weeks [again]. For the very same reason we do not use the SwitchRESMBX utility in situations where people work with passive (not yet switched) mailboxes in target.

Dell Quest Migration Tools: Readiness for Windows Server 2012 and Exchange 2013

Actually we can see a good market response to the new Microsoft Server flagships, Windows Server 2012 and Exchange 2013.
Migration projects are still ahead and probably will not die in 2013.

The following table shows the readiness of the Quest migration tool suite  and answers the question whether the tool can be installed on a Windows Server 2012, whether it can migrate Active Directory to Windows 2012 and mail systems to Exchange 2013.

Microsoft did not release a new version of ADMT yet (the most actual version is still 3.2), that is fully compliant with Windows 2012 functional mode domains, nor can you install ADMT 3.2 on a Windows Server 2012 member server. Actually, a migration from a Windows 2008 R2 domain to a Windows 2012 domain with 2012 functional level can neither be achieved by using the native tool (ADMT) nor Quest Migration Manager for Active Directory.

Active Directory Product Version Tool installation on Windows Server 2012? Can backup/restore AD data on Windows Server 2012 DCs? OR Can migrate data to Windows 2012 DCs?
Recovery Manager for Active Directory Forest Edition 8.2.1 yes yes
Recovery Manager for Active Directory 8.2.1 yes yes
Migration Manager for Active Directory 8.9 No no
       
Migration Product Version Tool installation on Windows Server 2012? Can migrate data to Exchange 2013? Office 365?
Migration Manager for Exchange 8.9 no no/yes
Migration Manager for Exchange IntraOrg Edition 1.0.1 no yes
Notes Migrator for Exchange 4.6.1 no (no Windows 8 admin workstation) yes/yes
Coexistence Manager for Notes 3.4 no yes/yes
Groupwise Migrator for Exchange 4.2 no (no Windows 8 admin workstation) yes/yes